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2nd International Congress on Mental Health

Amsterdam, Netherlands

Puvashnee Nydoo

Puvashnee Nydoo

University of KwaZulu-Natal- Nelson R Mandela School of Medicine, South Africa

Title: Antenatal depression scores in newly diagnosed HIV-infected and uninfected women in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
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Biography

Biography: Puvashnee Nydoo

Abstract

Prevalence rates of HIV infection in KwaZulu-Natal are high, with a significant amount of those infected being women of reproductive age. A diagnosis of HIV infection has been associated with an increased risk for the development of depression. Antenatal depression is a serious health concern, with the potential to cause wide-reaching adverse consequences for both mother and unborn child. This study compared depressive scores between newly diagnosed HIV-infected and uninfected pregnant women in KwaZulu-Natal to elucidate any association between a new diagnosis of HIV infection and the development of antenatal depression. 102 newly HIV tested Black African pregnant women were recruited from antenatal clinics at two regional hospitals; and were stratified based on HIV status (HIV-infected: n=40; HIV-uninfected: n=62). Women’s sociodemographic and clinical data were recorded, before being assessed for depression using an IsiZulu version of the Edinburgh Depression Scale. Of the sample, 9.8% suffered from depression. Prevalence rates of antenatal depression did not differ significantly between HIV-infected and uninfected cohorts (p=0.79). A diagnosis of HIV infection (p<0.0001) and maternal age (p=0.03) are risk factors for antenatal depression. Unemployment (p=0.09) is a borderline risk factor for the development of antenatal depression. Our sample demonstrated a low prevalence rate of depression. A new diagnosis of HIV infection in pregnancy places women at an increased risk for the development of antenatal depression. Younger age and unemployed status may influence depression. This study provides an important step in documenting the need for screening for antenatal depression in HIV associated pregnancies.


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